New tools-Dried Indigo

27 May

I’ve shared photos of my Japanese Indigo leaf harvest before so some of this is repeat for some readers. For other readers this is worth repeating. My Japanese Indigo crop sprouted in February, way early for the Texas Hill Country. Sprouts came from discarded seeds and root stock left on the ground last season. This bonus crop is now in the way of planting new seedlings. So time to try new harvesting tools and drying methods with this bonus crop. I can tell by it’s height and leaf size as it goes to seed it is not as vigorous as new annuals. So it needs to clear the way for this year’s seedlings.

I have electric clippers that I use in garden trimming (arthritis slows me down). Will they work faster than scissors? Caution….

The clippers worked well. I tried drying the leaves in the same set up I have for a different Indigo but I went back to my bundle and hang method. Why? The May winds blow over my temporary setup. For now, I’ve secured it to a gate. There is no wind to contend with in August and September when I usually harvest. Remember….bonus crop due to the Texas rains last fall & late winter temperatures.

A couple of days will render these bundles to a dry level that will enable me to easily strip off the leaves of the stems. But one always looks for alternatives in one’s circumstances and environment.

Don’t tell my husband…

9 May

Comparing window screens on hand to the traditional Japanese Leno gauze for paste resist. Of course, the traditional gauze works flawlessly…

The component is thin and really open at 18 squares across an inch.

The spare aluminum screen worked but left large screen lines. The redeeming factor was the large working area for several commercial stencils to be laid down.

It came in at 18 squares across the inch but the component used to weave the screen is thick and leaves its mark in the paste resist.

My Pella window screen won the commercial screen test.

It came in at about 17 squares per inch with slightly thinner component. One must remember to spray well to soften the paste resists so it settles into place on the textile after you lift the screen.

The final test is the indigo bath…more to report.

Work Before the Dye Pot

3 May

“When Life Spirals Out of Control” series

You carve & create the stencils

You create the paste resist from bran & sweet rice flour & steam it. That was yesterday’s project.

You prep the fabric, should have done this while paste was steaming.

You lay the paste down, carefully & slowly.

And go on to the next piece….notice I am not to the dye stuff yet. That was grown, harvested & dried last year.

Will allow to dry overnight, then on to dye pot.

San Francisco Beginner Dye Talk

2 Apr

Inviting my California digital dye friends to come hear my dye talk in San Francisco to the Textile Arts Council at the DeYoung Museum.

ROOTS, WOOD, BUGS AND BERRIES: NATURAL DYES

Presented by Deb McClintock
Saturday, June 15, 2019, 10 am
Koret Auditorium, de Young Museum

http://www.textileartscouncil.org/roots-wood-bugs-and-berries-natural-dyes/

Gasp…Japanese Indigo in mid-March in the Hill Country

24 Mar

Truly unusual, indigo in mid-March. When I left on my travels in mid-January I noticed that, for the first time my Japanese Indigo had sprouted on its own. In January. I figured it would freeze back, but come mid-February it had grown well and was holding it own. I left the country again thinking our late February or early March freezes would put it in its place.

Well, I am home now, my husband did defend the plants thru one deep freeze (serious husband points) and the indigo is thriving, even blooming. Normally this time of year I would be turning the soil, enriching it, placing the drip hose and eyeing the seeds figuring out when to start the seed packs.

So, now what do I do? Let it continue to grow till it hits a foot and harvest it? I am tempted to do a pigment extraction. I usually dry & hold. Suggestions are welcome.

This is truly a bonus crop from last year’s seeds left in place. We still have cricket season in the near future. If I do see cricket chomping I will harvest. In the meantime I will dig out my seeds and prep my seedlings to drop in between these early bonus plants.

Winter Garden Chores

12 Jan

Temps here in Texas are just weird this season. Japanese Indigo seeds are sprouting early. Never have they sprouted in January.

Madder root are poking new shoots out rather than going dormant. Mid-January is just not the time for this dye plant behavior.

Being the weather opportunist I had Emerald Landscape local folks out to pull a large perennial flower bed which was past its prime, weed & layout a pad for an indigo pot work area. More to come on this pot install journey later.

After 10 years here our rosemary had gotten old and overgrown and needed to be pulled. Since John & I have also gotten older as well the day of garden muscle help was most welcome.

Since I did not have to wrestle rosemary bushes out of the ground I used this wet day to trim back madder root away from acanthus bushes and save the roots for dyeing. I hate to toss red roots. The gardeners think I am nuts.

Here are the roots after cleaning. I will let them dry for a couple of days and then cut them smaller for further drying.

The garden bed is now prepped for the 3 year root harvest. It has been 4 years since the last harvest. More to come on this harvest later. Where’s my pitchfork?

Life Interrupted By Dementia

2 Dec

I don’t post my finished product much to this blog. I tend to focus on “the process” but here is an exception. Much gratitude to Linda Haddock at EchoInJohnsonCity for her generosity in creating a salute to Dementia Awareness Month. My natural dye block woven rug which she purchased via the Hill Country Science Mill Auction is featured in her store.

A brief tour of the Echo Art Front Board

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